Five things to know from Maryland’s exhibition versus St. John’s

Maryland hosted the St. John’s University Red Storm Sunday afternoon in an 18-inning scrimmage as Fall baseball for the Terps is nearing its conclusion. Many newcomers to this Terrapins team had an opportunity to display their talent on the diamond while returning members were able to get in some reps versus a generally highly-regarded St. John’s squad. Here are five takeaways from the exhibition:

1. Terps bullpen cleaned up an early mess

Starter Nick Dean came into the game with some clear command issues. While his first two innings went unscathed, the lack of command was evident as seen by three walks being issued paired with no strikeouts. The command issues bit Dean in the back in the third inning when two walks and a bunt single combined to load the bases in the St. John’s third followed by a sacrifice fly. The damage continued when St. John’s Ryan Markey shot a two-run single over the head of Dean, who was then pulled in favor of freshman Sam Bello. Bello immediately made a difference after maneuvering his way out of the third inning and through a scoreless fourth inning. The Terps bullpen continued to put up zeroes in the St. John’s run column as the first half of the 18-inning marathon moved on with Sean

2. Patience paid off early

After falling behind 3-0 early in the game, the Terps offense made some great adjustments to get themselves back in the game. The biggest difference they made in their approach was having more patience at the plate and on the base paths. This was especially key after they watched their starting pitcher, Nick Dean, walk five St. John’s players. What that patience led to was a huge three-run fourth inning that began when freshman Troy Schreffler Jr. wisely held up at third base on a shallow single to center field off the bat of Randy Bednar. Freshman Tucker Flint then took a walk to load the bases, and the Terps ultimately unloaded them after a bases-loaded walk from Austin Chavis and a big two-run double by catcher Tavan Shahidi. The Terps proceeded to load the bases a second time but failed to do any more damage in the fourth. However, that inning would set the tone for the offense as the game progressed through the afternoon.

3. Tavan Shahidi flexes power with big performance

Redshirt junior Tavan Shahidi didn’t see the diamond that much in the 2019 season, but he made a great impression during Sunday afternoon’s contest. The Iowa native had grounded out in his first at-bat, but his next appearance came with a major opportunity to cash in some runs with the bases loaded. Shahidi looped a pitch into the right-field corner — just out of reach of St. John’s right fielder — to bring in two runs and tie the game which could later be seen as a big momentum swing. Shahidi followed up his first big at-bat another double, a monster shot off the right-field wall that nearly cleared the fence. His third at-bat put him in a big RBI spot with runners on second and third, and he converted yet again with a hard-hit single to left field. He would have one final at-bat in the ninth inning of game one, and he clearly didn’t slow down as he notched his fourth hit of the day. Shahidi would sit for the second half of today’s exhibition.

4. Randy Bednar had a monster day

Bednar finished the first half of the day by reaching three times in five appearances. His first was a walk in the first inning as he was the only Terp to reach base in the first two innings. His next appearance had a much larger impact as he helped progress the Terps’ fourth-inning rally with a single. He would later come around to score on Shahidi’s two-run double. The game was tied at three runs apiece by the time Bednar came up for his third plate appearance, but Bednar wanting to change that, he smacked a pitch deep over the left-field fence to give Maryland a 4-3 lead. His next at-bat came with two runners in scoring position, and despite airing a ball towards the St. John’s left fielder, the sun prevented a clean play from being made as the left fielder misplayed the ball allowing two runs to score. His final at-bat of game one came in the eighth inning, but nothing came of it as he softly flew out to right field. Bednar started for game two, but after reaching on a walk in two plate appearances, he was pulled in favor of freshman Tucker Flint.

5. Freshman bullpen arms make great first impressions

In their first innings against a Division I school in St. John’s, both Sam Bello and Sean Burke put on great first impressions. As mentioned earlier, both were sent to the mound following early trouble for the Terps starter, but there’s nothing more they could’ve done to hold St. John’s to three runs. Bello had entered the game in the second, inheriting three base runners after Nick Dean was unable to record an out. While Bello allowed all three to cross the plate, he was able to escape the third inning without allowing further damage as he ultimately produced a flyout and struck out a pair of hitters. Bello looked to be settled in during the fourth inning as he recorded two more strikeouts induced a flyout. Sean Burke would take over for the next couple of innings. Despite some control issues for the redshirt freshman (three walks in two innings), Burke shut down St. John’s bats for two innings while racking up four strikeouts. In game two of the doubleheader, lefty Ryan Ramsey was another freshman that emerged from the Terps bullpen, and he had looked just as good as his fellow freshman for an inning. He would run into some trouble in the next after walking the bases loaded, but his appearance ended there.

 

 

Team Papio dominates for second straight win in Fall World Series

In the bottom of the third inning, Team Papio shortstop Ben Cowles sent out a deep ball as centerfielder Troy Schreffler could do nothing but stand and watch as it cleared the wall.

Cowles’ two-run big fly opened the game wide open as Team Papio went on to defeat Team Swope 16-6 for the team’s second consecutive blowout win in the Fall World Series.

The offense-heavy victory for Papio began in the first inning of the contest. The inning started with three batters reaching base. Center fielder Chris Alleyne led off by reaching on an error, followed by a drop-third strike that scored Alleyne after he stole two bases. The center fielder ended the game with three stolen bases.

First baseman Michael Pineiro followed with the game’s first hit, leaving left fielder Ben Irvine to do the heavy lifting. Irvine sent a dart past a diving Josh Maguire up the middle to drive in two runs, closing out a three-run first inning.

To finish the onslaught, Alleyne led off the sixth with solo shot that sailed to dead center, followed by an RBI double by Cowles to plate the team’s 16th run.

Team Papio managed to get a leadoff runner on base in five out of six innings of play. Eight hits were spread equally throughout the lineup as both new and returning faces contributed in the win.

Small ball drove in a majority of the runs for Team Papio, aside from the big hits from Cowles and Irvine. A total of 16 walks for the team landed runners on base in every inning, and even drove in some of the team’s runs.

On the other side of the ball, Team Papio starter Mike Vasturia shined on the mound in his 2019 Fall World Series debut. In four innings of work, the right-hander tallied three strikeouts while allowing just three hits and a run.

Despite the blowout loss, Team Swope wasn’t all that bad at the plate once Vasturia went to the dugout.

The offense showed signs of life in the fifth inning when Vasturia exited the game. Catcher Brenton Davis plated two runs on a single that ended Team Papio’s shutout.

In the final inning, Team Swope managed to score four runs off a Randy Bednar single and a Maxwell Costes double down the left field line.

Defensive woes were prevalent in the game, however.  Team Swope issued six consecutive walks in the fourth inning to bring in four runs in the defeat.

The 16 runs scored for Team Papio increase the team’s total in the first two games of the Fall World Series to 21, while conceding just seven runs.

The full Maryland baseball team will be back in action on Sunday as the Terrapins take on St. John’s in an 18-inning exhibition.

 

Team Papio comes out on top in Fall World Series Game 1

Team Papio pulled out all the stops in Game 1 of the Fall World Series, utilizing all aspects of their game for the 5-1 win over Team Swope on Friday in College Park.

A combination of small ball and big hits put Team Papio on the board first, with a four-run fourth inning. A walk and stolen base from Austin Chavis, followed by a single from Tucker Flint put runners on the corners as James Heffley stepped to the plate.

Heffley hadn’t started the game, but after junior catcher Justin Vought was hit in the left wrist by a pitch while at bat in the second inning the freshman got the nod.

In his first plate appearance, he proved he could compete and laid down a squeeze bunt that drove home Chavis and left Flint at second. Then, after Team Swope reliever Ryan Ramsey walked one batter and hit another, freshman Matt Orlando roped a bases-clearing double to the wall in left field for the 4-0 lead.

“I just jumped on the first fastball I got and put a pretty good swing on it,” Orlando said. “We’ve been preparing since last night…we had a game plan. We had a lot of quality at-bats.”

The following inning it was Chris Alleyne who went deep, his long shot carrying over the left field wall to put Team Papio up 5-0 heading into the sixth inning.

“You have to have multiple ways to score,” head coach Rob Vaughn said. “Ideally, for our offense to run right, you’ve got to lengthen and shorten the field… Heffley comes in, executes a safety and, worse case, you leave that inning you’re up 1-0 and with your pitchers throwing the ball pretty good. But instead, [Orlando] comes up and gets that big hit.”

Freshman starter Sam Bello and redshirt-freshman Sean Burke combined for 5 2/3 scoreless innings and seven strikeouts, before junior Sean Fisher entered in the top of the sixth after Burke gave up a run to Team Swope.

Fisher threw three consecutive strikes for the final punch-out of the inning, minimizing the damage and coming back out to secure the Team Papio victory in the seventh.

“Sam Bello got the nod today not because he has the best stuff,” Vaughn said, “though [Bello] is 90-92 [mph] with a breaking ball, but [because] his mentality is through the roof. That guy’s a competitor, he’s a winner.”

The same could be said for the other young pitchers on the mound Friday. Vaughn was happy with what he saw from the freshman pitchers; though they lack consistency, there’s big potential amongst the new faces in Maryland’s pitching staff. And, amongst the returning arms, some have newfound strength on the mound.

“Fisher does what Fisher does,” Vaughn said. “[He] had a tremendous summer up in the Cape…. [and] he’s been flat-dominant since he’s been back.”

Across the diamond, Team Swope’s battery of Nicholas Dean, Ramsey and David Falco threw four scoreless innings and four strikeouts, including two three-up, three-down innings from Dean.

“That’s prime-time, Friday night, legit stuff,” Vaughn said of Dean’s pitching arsenal.

“I saw a lot of focus,” Dean said of his fellow pitchers. “Guys need to be more confident working through the zone…just go right at hitters.”

Game 2 of the Fall World Series is set for 3:50 p.m. on Tuesday, Oct. 29.

Michigan eliminates Maryland from Big Ten tournament

After the Terps lost 10-4 to the Michigan Wolverines on Friday in Omaha, Nebraska, Maryland was eliminated from its first Big Ten tournament under second-year head coach Rob Vaughn.

Both defensively and offensively, the Terps struggled to get a handle on the Wolverines in the elimination game, Maryland’s first time facing elimination in the 2019 tournament.

Terrapin starter Tyler Blohm struggled to get a handle on the Wolverines offense, which scored two runs early in the first inning, after a leadoff walk and a single through the left side put two on and no outs.

A sac bunt moved both runners into scoring position and Michigan took the lead on a wild pitch from Blohm that bounced over a foot in front of the plate before getting past catcher Justin Vought. An RBI groundout plated the Wolverines’ second run of the half before Blohm induced a groundout to first base to end the half.

Head coach Rob Vaughn pulled the southpaw after Blohm walked Miles Lewis to start the second. When Elliot Zoellner entered, he walked the first batter he faced before securing three consecutive outs including his first strikeout of the day.

Zoellner threw 3.1 scoreless innings of relief, including a 1-2-3 third inning and a two-strikeout top of the fourth, where the righty worked around a leadoff single and a two-out hit-by-pitch.

After Zoellner secured the first out of the fifth inning, on a fly out to center field, Vaughn opted for the lefty-lefty matchup against Jesse Franklin and gave the ball to redshirt-freshman Drew Wilden. Though he walked Franklin, Wilden soon recorded the second out of the inning on a strikeout.

It seemed Wilden was almost out of the inning, with two outs and a runner on second after Franklin stole the base. But then Maryland’s inconsistent defense could not take advantage of a base-running miscue from Franklin, who scored on a throwing error from shortstop A.J. Lee.

The senior middle infielder caught Franklin in a rundown between second and third, but his throw to third baseman Taylor Wright bounced off of the Wolverine’s helmet and allowed Franklin to score and put a runner on third, after Jordan Brewer walked to initiate the strange sequence of events in the fifth.

But then, Lee send a two-out single into left field for the Terps’ fifth base runner on the day. Unlike with the previous four Maryland runners, however, Lee eventually came around to score, after Randy Bednar went deep to left field for his first hit of the tournament, a two-run blast that cut Michigan’s lead in half. Prior to the homer, Bednar was 0-for-10 in the postseason.

If not for the Terps’ error in the top of the inning, which eventually cost them two runs, Bednar’s homer would have tied the game at two runs apiece instead of cutting the Wolverines to a 4-2 lead.

Even so, Maryland’s middle-inning rally did not jump start the Terps’ offense, which continued to strand runners on the bases as Wolverine starter Tommy Henry consistently worked out of jams and held the Terps to their two runs. The southpaw struck out seven in his 6.0 innings of work, giving the two runs on five hits, one hit-by-pitch and one walk.

Michigan’s offense, however, seemed to feed off Maryland’s struggling relievers. Though right-hander Nick Turnbull threw one scoreless inning of relief in the sixth, after he took over for Wilden when the redshirt-freshman gave up a single to start the inning.

But after Turnbull hit the first batter of the seventh, sophomore Sean Fisher finished the inning and freshman Sean Heine threw the eighth. Both struggled against Michigan’s lineup. The Wolverines got two across in the seventh, one credited to Turnbull, the other to Fisher, before plating one in the eighth to pull ahead to a 7-2 lead.

A solo blast from Maxwell Costes, his third homer of the tournament, cut the Wolverines to a four-run lead, but the Terps couldn’t continue the freshman’s rally and went to the ninth trailing 7-3.

Michigan added three runs in the ninth on four doubles off of closer John Murphy, before the senior recorded a strikeout for the final out of the inning, the Wolverines ahead 10-3.

Maryland stranded seven runners on the day, as the Terps struggled to plate runs against the dominant Michigan squad in the elimination game. A two-out solo shot to left field from the senior Lee was the only run to cross the plate for the Terps in the ninth, as the Wolverines won 10-4 to advance to the tournament semifinals.

 

Maryland falls to Ohio State in postponed tournament game

Senior A.J. Lee stepped to the plate with two outs and a runner on second in the bottom of the ninth Friday morning, as Maryland trailing Ohio State 3-2 in the continuation of the Terps’ Thursday night game, which was suspended due to rain.

Just over a week earlier, Lee hit a two-run walk-off homer in the Terps’ series opener against the Iowa Hawkeyes in the final series of the regular season.

But, Lee couldn’t get the ball out of the outfield on Friday, and Maryland fell 3-2 to Ohio State as the Buckeyes sent the Terps to their first elimination game of the 2019 Big Ten tournament, a Friday afternoon matchup against the Michigan Wolverines.

Maryland struggled to find its offensive momentum when play resumed Friday morning, after a thunderstorm halted the Terps’ second round game against the Buckeyes on Thursday night.

When the game resumed Friday, the Terps had a runner on second and one out in the eighth, with Michael Pineiro at the plate. But Buckeyes reliever Andrew Magno recorded two strikeouts to neutralize the threat, then got three straight outs after a Maryland leadoff walk in the ninth to secure Ohio State’s second win of the tournament.

The Buckeyes plated the first run of the game early, when an RBI single plated Dominic Canzone, who worked a hit-by-pitch to start the inning. The Ohio State right fielder scored again in the third, after he walked to lead off the half and scored on a Maryland error, when third baseman Taylor Wright misthrew a ball Brady Cherry hit deep to the left side of the infield.

The Terps struggled to plate runs against Buckeyes starter Griffan Smith. Though Maryland had eight base runners against the lefty, on five hits and three walks, through the first 7 innings the Terps’ only runs came in the third, when freshman Maxwell Costes sent the first pitch of his at-bat deep to left field for a two-out, two-run homer and tied the game at two runs apiece.

Maryland right-hander Trevor LaBonte went 6.1 innings Thursday night for his longest start of the season, topping his previous 6.0 innings against Ohio State on April 21 in College Park. He gave up only two runs on two hits, three walks and two hit batters, striking out three.

Though the freshman right-hander provided the Terps with a solid start in his first Big Ten tournament appearance, holding the Buckeyes to two runs on two hits, three walks and two hit batters, the first 6.1 innings didn’t matter in the top of the eighth when Ohio State clawed back on top, capitalizing on another Maryland defensive miscue.

After Cowles dropped a popup in foul territory, failing to secure the second out of the eighth, Cherry singled to center field. Then, Terrapin reliever Mark DiLuia walked a batter to load the bases, and a sacrifice fly plated the go-ahead run for the Buckeyes.

But DiLuia continued to battle on the rubber, and after walking another batter to re-load the bases, the righty took Nick Erwin seven pitches deep, securing the final out of the inning on a strikeout that stranded the bases loaded.

The Terps carried the momentum from DiLuia’s strikeout into the bottom of the inning, after consecutive hits from Wright and Costes, but the weather did not cooperate and the game was suspended until Friday, Maryland trailing 3-2 with 1.2 innings left to play.

Right when the Terps seemed primed to mount an eighth-inning rally, after the Ohio State Buckeyes took the 3-2 tie-breaking lead in the top of the inning, Maryland’s second game of the Big Ten tournament entered into a weather delay on Thursday night before the game was suspended, to be picked back up at 11 a.m. ET on Friday.

Just before the delay, Maryland head coach Rob Vaughn challenged the call on the field that Taylor Wright was out at second, after a grounder to third base from Maxwell Costes, who reached first on the fielder’s choice then landed on second on a throwing error from second baseman Matt Carpenter.

If the call had been reversed the Terps would have had two runners in scoring position with no outs. But, the call was upheld and the game suspended with Costes on second and one out, after lightning in the vicinity of TD Ameritrade Park in Omaha, Nebraska, halted play and sent both teams retreating to the locker rooms.

When play picked back up Friday, Ohio State reliever Andrew Magno remained on the mound, securing a pair of strikeouts to rid Maryland of its one base runner and end the eighth.

Then, Maryland called on freshman left-hander Andrew Vail to hold Ohio State to its one-run lead in the ninth. Vail recorded three consecutive outs and gave the Terps the chance for their second walk-off victory in eight days.

But Magno continued to dominate on the mound, and Maryland’s rally fell short and sent the Terps to the elimination game against the Wolverines Friday afternoon, with a tentative 4:30 p.m. ET start.

Maryland defeats Illinois in first game of Big Ten Tournament

In the Maryland’s first Big Ten tournament appearance under second-year head coach Rob Vaughn, the Terps continued their hot streak, defeating the Illinois Fighting Illini 6-2 on Wednesday in Omaha, Nebraska, to move on to the winner’s bracket.

Maryland got on the board first, after loading the bases on a pair of walks and an infield single from Josh Maguire. A fielder’s choice from Randy Bednar drove in Chris Alleyne from third, giving the Terps a 1-0 lead.

After Illinois starter Andy Fisher retired the Terps in order in the first, Maryland had runners reach base in every inning. Even so, the Terps struggled to plate runners and provide Parsons with a bigger lead with which to work. The lack of solid run support from Maryland came back to haunt the Terps, as they stranded a total of 12 on the day.

Illinois finally got a runner on base in the fourth, after Parsons threw three consecutive 1-2-3 innings to start. After the Fighting Illini’s first hit, a one- out single to right field from Michael Massey, Parsons walked two with two outs to load the bases. But the Maryland right-hander induced a huge ground out to end the half and strand the bases loaded, maintaining the Terps’ 1-0 lead.

But the Fighting Illini continued to threaten in the fifth, putting two on after a leadoff single from Grant Van Scoy and two-out walk. Then, a single to second base from Massey drove home Van Scoy, who beat the throw from Ben Cowles after the second baseman bobbled the ball and hesitated before throwing home.

Parsons found his groove again in the sixth and seventh, however, retiring the Fighting Illini in order in both innings to give the Terps the chance to pull ahead as the right-hander threw his 115th pitch on the day.

Then, the Maryland lineup came alive in the eighth. After Taylor Wright led off the inning with a single through the left side against the shift, freshman Maxwell Costes sent a two-run homer to left field. Then, two batters later, sophomore Justin Vought went deep with a two-run shot of his own, putting the Terps ahead 5-1 and providing Parsons much-needed run support.

Parsons threw 7.1 innings, allowing only one run on four hits and threw walks, recording four strikeouts in his 123 pitches thrown. After the righty secured the first out of the eighth with a runner on first, Mark DiLuia entered to secure the final two outs of the half. The sophomore recorded a three-pitch called strikeout and induced a fly-out to end the inning and hold on to Maryland’s lead.

Behind DiLuia, the Terps tacked on another run on a drag bunt single from Alleyne in the ninth. Illinois tacked on a run in the ninth, but senior closer John Murphy recorded back-to-back strikeouts to secure Maryland’s first win of the conference tournament.

Maryland takes on the winner of No. 2 Michigan and No. 7 Ohio State at 6 p.m. ET on Thursday.

 

 

Maryland sweeps Iowa, clinches postseason berth

Maryland players sprinted out of the dugout, engulfing closer John Murphy in the infield Saturday evening. The Terps had just clinched their first appearance in the Big Ten Tournament under second-year head coach Rob Vaughn.

“It’s pretty awesome,” Murphy said. “Especially because this is the same weekend I got ejected last year, so I’m pretty happy I didn’t get ejected this weekend and get to be there for all three games with my team.”

Murphy, who entered in the ninth, recorded three straight outs to ensure Maryland’s 10-8 win over Iowa (30-22, 12-12), earning his 11th save of the year in the Terps’ final game of the regular season in College Park.

“What John Murphy did at the end was awesome,” Vaughn said. “That game was kind of a culmination of our season. We get up, have moments that are really good, we have moments were we give it up, then have moments that are really good again.”

Until the top of the eighth, when Iowa tied the game for the third time on the day, it seemed Maryland (28-27, 12-12) had already won the back-and-forth battle. Though Iowa got on the board first, on a Tanner Padgett solo homer to start the second inning, Maryland quickly clawed its way back on top.

After starter Tyler Blohm worked out of the top of the inning, Maryland sophomores Michael Pineiro and Justin Vought sent back-to-back solo shots deep to left-center field to start the bottom half.

“When Pineiro’s going oppo-jack, that gets people going a little bit,” Vaughn said. “Those [homers] were huge…[they] kind of captured the momentum back and let us play with the lead.”

Two more runs crossed in the third for the Terps, giving Blohm a 4-1 lead off a Hawkeyes error and a handful of Iowa defensive miscues. Senior A.J. Lee, who reached first on an error for the second time on the day,  scored on a wild pitch from left-hander Grant Judkins, who walked three Terps in the half. Maryland’s second run came on an RBI sacrifice bunt from Pineiro.

“We talk about how you respond in the midst of adversity,” Vaughn said, “That’s one of our pillars…and every inning that [Iowa] scored, we answered. I mean, the offensive effort today was unbelievable, absolutely unbelievable.”

But the Hawkeyes came back, and a Wetrich three-run homer tied the game at four runs apiece in the fourth. With that, the Terps brought in right-hander Trevor LaBonte, who hit the first batter he faced but worked out of the jam with his first strikeout of the game.

Blohm finished his 3.2 innings of work allowing four runs on four walks and four hits, including the two homers. Behind a solid Maryland offense, LaBonte threw three scoreless innings of relief, before faltering in the eighth.

“If we call it what it is,” Vaughn said, “Blohm’s stuff was terrible today…and he still [went] out and gave us three or four innings. I mean, that’s Tyler Blohm..that’s just who he is.”

After Iowa tied the game in the top of the fourth, Maryland regained the lead on two runs in the bottom of the inning, after Benjamin Cowles and Randy Bednar singled around an A.J. Lee double. Bednar’s hit scored Cowles, and a sacrifice fly from senior Taylor Wright plated Lee, putting the Terps up 6-4 heading to the fifth.

Then, Maryland designated hitter Josh Maguire doubled to start the bottom half for the Terps. The freshman cruised home two outs later on a sac fly from Cowles for the Terps seventh run on the night. Two innings later, Maguire scored again on Cowles sacrifice fly, putting Maryland ahead 8-4.

But LaBonte started to tire in the eighth, loading the bases on a walk and two singles after striking out the first batter he faced in the inning. Then, Andrew Vail relieved his fellow freshman, but gave up a game-tying grand slam to Wetrich before working his way out of the inning.

“I told them,” Vaughn said, “When [Iowa] did hit that grand slam, I said, ‘We’re going to see what kind of character we’ve got.'”

Chris Alleyne stepped into the box in the eighth, runners on first and second with two outs. Then, Alleyne roped a double into the right field corner, clearing the bases and putting Maryland ahead 10-8 heading to the ninth.

“It really just shows what kind of offense we can have,” Lee said. “When all cylinders are firing, we’re pretty good. When we’re moving barrels and we’re swinging at good pitched and we’re getting our swing off, we’re pretty good.”

Iowa put up a fight against senior closer John Murphy in the ninth. But Murphy was not having it, and after the Hawkeyes got a double to start the inning, Murphy struck out one and induced a pop fly to first base. Then, a fly out to Bednar in right field, which ended the game with the Terps on top.

“It was pretty tough [Friday] night,” Murphy said. “It made it easier that we still came back and won, but to do that today and to send us to Omaha, that was pretty awesome, especially on Senior Day.”

“I don’t know if I’ve been more proud of a group of guys than that group of dudes standing out there,” Vaughn said. “That was a gutty, character win for a team that’s [still] learning. Everything they’ve been through in the last six months…everything they withstood, I am so incredible proud of that group.”